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Grants from DCMS and Arts Council England for Arts and Culture in 2015/16, by London Borough

Funding awards made to arts and culture organisations and National Portfolio Organisations (NPO) in each London borough in 2015/16. Click on a borough to find out more.

The funding sources included are:

  • Grants for the Arts (ACE)
  • Managed Funds (ACE)
  • Museum Development Grants (ACE)
  • Museums Resilience Fund (ACE)
  • NPO Funding (ACE)
  • Youth Music – Fund A (ACE)
  • Youth Music – Fund B (ACE)
  • Grant in Aid (DCMS)

This map does not cover any funding awarded in previous years for multi-year projects, so, for example, Creative People and Places Programmes in Hounslow and Barking and Dagenham are not included. It also does not include spending by local authorities on arts and culture.

A full list of each of the projects awarded funding in each borough can be found by clicking on the outline of the appropriate borough on the map.

Summary

This map is not intended to offer a comprehensive picture of all arts and culture funding going into London, but offers a snapshot of the awards made during 2015/16. As can be seen from the map, London is not a homogenous entity, and the picture of ACE and DCMS cultural investment varies considerably across the capital. 92 per cent of the total funding awards made in 2015/16 went to organisations in just eight London boroughs. This primarily reflects the locations of significant national institutions, such as the British Museum, the Science Museum and the National Gallery.

It also reflects the variation in location of the Arts Council’s National Portfolio Organisations (NPOs). Again, the majority of these organisations are concentrated in a small number of boroughs. Five London boroughs each have more than 25 NPOs inside their boundaries, yet nine London boroughs have just one, and six have none at all. While this doesn’t tell the whole story – the funding reflects where the organisation is based, and not necessarily where its activities are delivered – it does reflect some of the difficulties London faces in boosting its traditionally low participation rates.

Much of the national debate around arts funding is based around a narrative that London gets more than its fair share. It is clear that these perceptions of an imbalance towards London are overstated. By 2018, 75 per cent of National Lottery funding for the arts will be spent outside of London, with London’s share reducing by 40 per cent compared to 2012 levels.

This narrative also often fails to reflect that London’s cultural offer is for everyone, not just Londoners and contributes substantially to the UK’s offer to both domestic and international tourists. Proximity to provision does not necessarily translate into better access and London has consistently seen lower levels of engagement with the arts among its residents than most other English regions over the last decade.

London Councils wants to see an equitable and effective spread of arts and cultural funding, networks and activities across England, but this must be achieved without doing irreparable harm to London’s cultural sector. More equitable access to ACE’s strategic funds is also important to prevent many areas in London being left out of the place-making agenda.